Will the iPhone 7 finally last a full day? Apple launches recruitment drive for iOS battery and power experts

Posted in iPhone News by admin. Published April 2nd, 2015

Will the iPhone 7 finally last a full day? Apple launches recruitment drive for iOS battery and power experts

Apple made significant improvements to the battery life of its iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, but they still fail to last more than a full day with typical usage.

To address these issues, the tech giant is recruiting for battery and power software experts.

At least nine job listings have been spotted on the firm’s official recruitment site as the company looks to boost the battery across its range of mobiles and laptops.

Fan site AppleInsider has spotted nine job listings on Apple's official recruitment site in the past month that relate to batteriesThis includes one for an iOS battery life software engineer and another for iOS software power systems engineer (pictured)

Fan site AppleInsider has spotted nine job listings on Apple’s official recruitment site in the past month that relate to batteries. These include one for an iOS battery life software engineer (pictured left) and another for iOS software power systems engineer (pictured right)

The job listings were discovered by fan site AppleInsider and include listings for an iOS battery life software engineer, a software power systems engineer, battery pack engineering manager and a cell engineer.

In particular, the iOS software power systems engineer role said the successful candidate ‘will be working on design and development of software for triage of battery life issues, modeling of power consumed by different parts of the system, and analytics to understand large scale battery life trends.’

As the site suggests, this shows Apple is looking to boost the battery on iOS devices but also its range of MacBooks.

Apple’s larger iPhone 6 and 6 Plus have been found to last about eight hours with heavy usage and up to 22 hours with normal usage – although its difficult to quantify what ‘normal usage’ is and this can differ from person to person.

These times have only been beaten by Samsung’s latest Galaxy S6.

Apple also said its new 12-inch MacBook uses 30 per cent less energy than the previous model and could last more than nine hours on a single charge.

However, official figures suggest its Watch in particular will struggle to last for anywhere near that long.

Boss Tim Cook said at the launch event last month that the Watch will last 18 hours, but this only includes 90 time checks, 90 notifications, 45 minutes of app use, and a 30-minute workout with music.

Apple is expected to launch an iPhone 6S, 6S Plus as well as potentially a four-inch model later this year.

Battery improvements could be made to these handsets, or they may be a feature on next year’s iPhone 7.

Alternatively, because a number of the jobs refer to a software rather than hardware engineer, these battery improvements could be made and rolled out to existing phones as part of an iOS upgrade.

Earlier this week Atmel released its latest microcontrollers (MCUs) for a variety of gadgets that are so low power they can harvest energy from a person’s body.

The SAM L microcontrollers are part of Atmel’s 32-bit ARM-based MCU range and are powered by chip maker ARM’s Cortex M0+ 32-bit processors.

A number of Apple devices, including the iPhone 5S and iPad Air are powered by chips based around ARM technology.

Atmel said its MCUs extend ‘battery life from years to decades, reducing the number of times batteries need to be changed in devices such as fire alarms, healthcare, medical, wearable, and devices placed in rural, agriculture, offshore and other remote areas.’

Apple's iPhone 6 and 6 Plus have been found to last about eight hours with heavy usage and up to 22 hours with normal usage - although its difficult to quantify what 'normal usage' is and this can differ from person to person. Apple also said its new 12-inch MacBook (pictured) uses 30% less energy than previous models

Apple’s iPhone 6 and 6 Plus have been found to last about eight hours with heavy usage and up to 22 hours with normal usage – although its difficult to quantify what ‘normal usage’ is and this can differ from person to person. Apple also said its new 12-inch MacBook (pictured) uses 30% less energy than previous models

Apple boss Tim Cook said the Watch's 'all-day' battery life lasts 18 hours with 'typical use' - but official tests recently revealed this equates to just 90 time checks, 90 notifications, 45 minutes of app use, and a 30-minute workout with music. Apple defines the battery on its Watch page and said a time check  lasts four seconds 

Apple boss Tim Cook said the Watch’s ‘all-day’ battery life lasts 18 hours with ‘typical use’ – but official tests recently revealed this equates to just 90 time checks, 90 notifications, 45 minutes of app use, and a 30-minute workout with music. Apple defines the battery on its Watch page and said a time check lasts four seconds

They use a third of the power of rival chips and tests have shown they are the lowest power microprocessor ever made.

The microcontrollers run on the firm’s picoPower technology and Atmel’s Event System that makes different parts of the device work together to carry out tasks.

By effectively ‘sharing’ energy, the whole device uses less power and, subsequently, less battery.

It can also manage how much energy is being used by other components to make them as efficient as possible.

Plus, the technology is so low power it can harvest energy from the body using changes in temperature.

Earlier this week Atmel released its latest microcontrollers (MCUs) for a variety of gadgets that are so low power they can even harvest energy from a person's body. Atmel said its MCUs extend 'battery life from years to decades, reducing the number of times batteries need to be changed in devices'

Earlier this week Atmel released its latest microcontrollers (MCUs) for a variety of gadgets that are so low power they can even harvest energy from a person’s body. Atmel said its MCUs extend ‘battery life from years to decades, reducing the number of times batteries need to be changed in devices’

During a demonstration of the microcontrollers at this year's CES, Andreas Eieland, Atmel's director of product marketing demonstrated how he could power a radio by placing his hand on a panel. This panel recognised a change in temperature between the hand and the room and this was harvested to create charge

During a demonstration of the microcontrollers at this year’s CES, Andreas Eieland, Atmel’s director of product marketing demonstrated how he could power a radio by placing his hand on a panel. This panel recognised a change in temperature between the hand and the room and this was harvested to create charge

[Thanks: http://www.dailymail.co.uk]

iPhone-News-Updated


Share this :
[ del.icio.us | Google | Linkagogo | Digg | reddit | Squidoo | StumbleUpon | Yahoo MyWeb ]

Buy iPhone from Amazon

Comments are closed.


Search

Follow me on Twitter

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner


Buy iPhone from Amazon

Pages


Recent post


Tag cloud


Categories

Gadget Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory
Powered by  MyPagerank.Net
surfgopher.com

website monitoring service

site statistics
eXTReMe Tracker



iPhoneFan
Wordpress Theme


Designed by Bacteriano based on iPhone PSD file designed by Manicho.